Archive for May, 2009

Resume Mistake #4: Elevating Yourself Above the Job

How many times have you heard the word overqualified?  Anytime I see a manager applying for a lesser position, I immediately assume this person is looking to take any available job until he or she can find a better one. 

 

Tip: If you truly want the lower level position, downplay the upper level responsibilities and emphasize the lower level tasks and accomplishments required at that level.

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Resume Mistake #3: Trying to Reel in the Big One Without a Hook

 

When jobs were plentiful and skilled workers were at a premium, you could expect a recruiter or hiring official to study each resume, willing to make whatever mental leap necessary to deem the candidate a fit for the job. Today, hiring officials believe there are enough resources on the market that they do not need to settle for anything less than the perfect candidate. Budgets are tight, and by golly they expect the most bang from every buck. The price for finding this perfect specimen is sifting through a mountain of resumes. To do this, recruiters and hiring officials must shift into rapid elimination mode, allowing each resume only a brief glance to prove itself worthy of the short list.

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Resume Mistake #2: Sending the One-Size-Fits-All Resume

The three most important aspects of the resume: Emphasis, Emphasis, Emphasis.

 

Okay, here’s the situation. I’m a recruiter and I’m advertising a systems architect position for one of my clients.  I have a desk full of job orders to fill and more under- and overqualified candidates than I can possibly interview in a month’s time, and they’re steadily coming in by the droves. My ad requests candidates to first submit a resume. If you are qualified, I will contact you. And you can bet I will because I need to fill this position before my competition scoops me.

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Resume Mistake #1: Listening to Resume Experts

When I started twenty years ago as a programmer, I read every book and article I could find on resume writing.  Over the past five years, I’ve had the privilege to recruit hundreds of IT professionals, reviewing no less than 65 resumes a day.  I look back at some of the advice I read and have only one word: nonsense!  

 

Resume experts have leveled forests with how-to books.  They have many different theories on resume writing, most subjective, some contrary to others, but all designed to sell books.  To be sure, no single book fits all when you consider the different professions, industries, and employee grade levels from clerk to CEO.  What’s good for one profession might not apply to another.  

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Identity Theft and Your Online Job Search

We found this article posted on www.blog.careers.org and we thought it gave good information regarding a widely unknown threat- identity theft related to online career searching. 

(Original Article Source:  http://EzineArticles.com/)

 

While identity theft is nothing new, the Web has opened up whole new world of opportunity for identity thieves.

 

According to the FBI, identity theft is the top online fraud. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission says that identity theft is its number one source of consumer complaints – 42 percent of all complaints, in 2001.

 

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Recruiting and Relationship Building

Most employers and hiring officials spend a good portion of their time and resources in the hiring process.  The time invested and costs of sourcing top candidates for key positions are significant.  Companies and managers go to great lengths to try to entice the best professionals to come on board their organization, instead of the competition.  Oftentimes, candidates are flown in, wined and dined and offered a multitude of other perks, just to draw them in.

 

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Am I in the Right Job?

There are tons of self-help books and tests to determine which career you are most suited for.  Personally, I still like “What Color Is Your Parachute,” which has been a New York Times bestseller each time it has been updated and revised.  There is also a pretty cool quiz you can take:  http://quiz.ivillage.co.uk/uk_work/tests/career.htm

 

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Thank You Notes after Interviewing

A well written thank you note is a common courtesy and an appropriate follow-up to every interview.  Consider this step to be an important contact with your prospective employer, as well as, an additional presentation of your skills.  If your interview was set up through a recruiter, ask that person for the email information of all of the interviewers you spoke with.  If you are on a direct interview, it is a good practice to get business cards before you leave so that you will have sufficient follow-up information.  Content is crucial beyond the standard “thank you for your time”.  Each note should be uniquely written for each interviewer, referencing something that transpired in the interview.  Reiterate why you are uniquely qualified for their opportunity. 

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May1st is May Day!

May1st is May Day!  This is always great fun if you are in the UK.  Aside from a day off and the beginning of the Summer Holidays, it’s a traditional day of festivities including swinging on Maypoles, dancing and jigs in the parks and the crowning of the Queen of the May.  Many homes decorate with flowers and everything looks so pretty; you are supposed to kiss anyone who has great flowers.  Schools put on plays and display artwork with tons of flowers and pretty Summer scenes.  Since being in Tennessee, May Day seems to go by completely unnoticed, so I thought I would let you know what you could be missing!  The US does honor May 1 as Law Day to reflect on the role of law in the foundation of the country and to recognize its importance for society; all important stuff, but doesn’t seem to conjure up quite the fun we had in England!!!

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