Archive for the ‘Career Advice’ Category

7 Tips for Creating Your Best LinkedIn Profile

As recruiters, we spend a lot of time on LinkedIn. The platform makes it easy to find potential candidates by searching for people with specific skill sets within a designated area, and it’s a tool on which we rely for providing the most up-to-date info on candidate’s current jobs and locations. While LinkedIn’s profile creator coaches new users on how to fill in each section of their profile, it can be helpful to know how to optimize your profile so you can get found and get connected with those who will boost your career. I’ve compiled a list of some of my favorite tips on curating a LinkedIn profile that will best serve you throughout your career.

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9 Questions Recruiters Ask

9 Questions Recruiters Ask

So, now that your fabulous new resume is out there, people are starting to notice. You should of course use it to apply to those jobs which are posted on company websites, but you should also post it on sites like CareerBuilder, Indeed, etc. These popular job sites not only function as a one-stop shop for applying to multiple positions with different companies, but they also serve as an ever-updating pool of active candidates for recruiters.

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First Impressions–Tips for a Better Resume

Hello CareerTalk!

Ok, here we go, my first bonafide blog post! Oh stop, please, sit down, thank you so much.

Your resume. Cue Beethoven’s fifth. This profile is often the first, and unfortunately sometimes the only, impression hiring officials get of you. There are other channels they can go through to get a more complete picture—your Linkedin, your website, Google Images (God forbid)—but they won’t bother if your resume doesn’t entice them enough to take the time to do so. As a recruiter, I’m buried in resumes. While I’m not a technical expert in each field for which I source talent, I can suss quality at a glance, and good candidates in any industry know how to produce resumes that inspire a longer look. The following are tips based for crafting a resume that makes recruiters pick up the phone.

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Listening and Empathy: Lost Arts

When clients hire me to train their staff in “soft skills,” they often ask me to teach “communications skills.”   They want their people to be able to create and give presentations, write coherently, speak courteously to help desk clients or identify business requirements by effectively interviewing end-users.

When I am hired to do Change Management for an IT Project, clients ask me to create a Communications Plan.  That plan includes key stakeholders and the message or key points we want to communicate to each person or group.

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IT’s Relationships

Over many years of consulting primarily for IT organizations I have noticed a pattern into which most IT groups fall.  They have poor or even contentious relationships – with internal customers, vendors, and sometimes even between groups within IT.

And most IT people will say, “So?  What we are supposed to do is technical stuff, relationships shouldn’t matter.”

Maybe relationships shouldn’t matter, but they do.  Unfortunately, I have seen superb technical organizations which are perceived by their internal customers as incompetent.  They are doing all of the right “technical stuff” — they have 99.99% system availability, clean databases, virus-free LANs, capable help-desks and a responsive network — but they are still perceived as incompetent because they have failed to build and maintain good relationships.

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CyberSecurity – Job Security

With cyberattacks on the rise in 2009, the FBI now considers such attacks to be the third greatest risk for our country, following nuclear war and weapons of mass destruction.  The fear of “Cybergeddon” has lead to government agencies and private companies alike recruiting experts in the field of security.  Obama is in the process of picking his top cybersecurity aide, while many other organizations are also searching for these important skills.

 

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Resume Formatting

Since online job marketing and searching has become so popular, some of the old rules of resume writing have changed.  Resume experts used to advise that you add your own personal flare and character to the resume.  These days, any formatting used to add such character can wreak havoc on your resume when it is added to an HTML database or when a major company tries to scan it into their employment files.  This could not only cause headaches for anyone reviewing your resume, but could even keep you from getting the job.  Here are some tips for formatting your resume to be technology friendly:

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Are There Jobs Out There?

These days, the news is filled with negative stories about the economy and employment.  You hear a lot about the less than 10% of people out of work, but very little focus on the 90% who have jobs.  The media also reports often about the companies with mass layoffs, but rarely mention companies who are growing or hiring.  So, are there any jobs out there? 

 

After performing a simple Google search for employment, I kept noticing the names of major companies in the mix.  Just to mention a few companies that I found with a large number of openings:

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Addressing the Out-of-Work Gap

As many know these days, maintaining a top resume can mean the difference between snagging an interview and ending up in the trash can.  However, what if you have been unemployed for a period of time and that is the first thing seen on your chronological resume?  There are a few ways of handling your unemployment situation which can help increase your chances of staying in the game and being a true competitor for the job.  During your unemployed period, it is not as important what you are not doing – meaning working – as it is important what you ARE doing and making it clear to the hiring manager.

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Acing the First Day

The first day on a new job can be very nerve racking, but it is important to remember that your first impressions can be lasting ones.  So how do you cool your nerves and ace that first day on the job?

 

First off, if you can, take a little time off before starting the new job to relax, breath deeply and prepare.

 

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